CULTURE

Shrine Etiquette / 神社参拝のマナー

2012.10.02 [CULTURE,WHAT'S NEW]

Shrine Etiquette / 神社参拝のマナー 

Japanese people visit shrines at various times throughout the year. One of the most
important times is New years, when the more
popular shrines become crowded with well
wishers looking to make their New Years.
By following these actions you are expressing
your respect. All actions here are independent
of religious beliefs.Unfortunately, many of
these actions are not properly followed by the Japanese people, as many today do not know
the proper etiquette.

 

日常の信仰の深さに関わらず、新年の初詣を
はじめ、家庭円満、商売繁盛、学業成就、安産、
良縁などの祈願や時には癒しを求めて、人は
神社を訪れます。それほどまでに、日本人に
愛されている神社ですが、正しい参拝の仕方を
身につけている人は意外に少ないのでは?
今回は、日本人も外国人も正しく参拝できるよう
に神社参拝のマナーを紹介しましょう。

 

Upon entering Torii shrine gates, pause
momentarily and bow once, with your hands by
your side.

 

 

まずは、鳥居のくぐり方。何気なく鳥居をくぐってしまう人を多くみかけますが、鳥居は、
神様のいらっしゃる神社の内と外との大切な境界線。本来は、鳥居をくぐる前に一礼をするのが
正しいマナーです。鳥居をくぐったら、神様の通り道である中央は通らず、端を静かに歩きます。

 

 

Temizuya / 手水舍(てみずや)

At the Temizuya, a small stone water basin just before the shrine. This is for purification, so please
don’t throw coins into the water. You will find small bamboo dippers around the basin. Take the dipper
about half way up it’s handle, and after scooping up some water, pour it towards you, so the water runs
down the handle, wetting it, but making sure the water falls outside of the basin. This purifies the handle.
Rinse your left hand first, then your right hand. Pour water into your left hand, and use it to rinse your
mouth. Don’t allow your lips to touch the dipper or swallow the water, spit it out beside the well.
You may notice that many Japanese forgo the mouth washing rites, and these days that is acceptable too.
Rinse your left hand again, then allow the remaining water to trickle down the handle over your right hand
again.

 

 

「手水舍(てみずや)」まで来たら、拝殿に向かう前に心身を清めます。
1.右手で柄杓(ひしゃく)を持ち、水を汲んだら柄杓を立てて、右手と柄杓の部分を清めます。
2.再度、水を汲んだら左手に水をかけ清めます。
3.柄杓を左手に持ち替え、水を汲み、右手を清めます。
4.再び、右手に柄杓を持ち替えて、左手に水を溜めます。
5.その水で口をすすぎましょう。
6.再度、左手を清めたら、静かに柄杓を元の場所に戻します。

 

 

 

Approach the main shrine building. You may wish to put some coins into the offertory box. If there
is a large thick rope with a bell attached, grasp it firmly with both hands and give it a short, hard
shake. This is to attract the attention of the Kami, the various gods enshrined within. Next, after
bowing twice, clap your hands together twice in front of you, holding them together in a prayer like
fashion after the second clap, and closing your eyes, or simply lowering your head, make a wish,
or offer thanks to the gods. Upon completing that, take a short step back, and bow once again.

 

  

心身共に清め終わった後は、拝殿へ進みましょう。
賽銭箱に賽銭を入れます。参拝者自身を祓い清め、お参りに来たことを神様にお知らせするために
神社の中央にある鈴を鳴らします。つづいては、二拝二柏手一礼。拝は、90度、体を折り曲げるのが正しいマナー。
柏手は、両手の指をしっかり揃え、胸の高さで、右手の指先を少し下にずらして打つのが良いとされています。
柏手の回数は、一般的に2回ですが、出雲大社の場合は4回とするなど、神社によって違いがありますので
神社ごとに確認を。 

 

 

When leaving the shrine, it is regarded as courteous to stop after passing through a torii gate,
about turn and bow once again. Samurai, upon leaving would turn clockwise, so that the swords
on their left hip do not face the shrine, then turn again anti-clockwise for the same reason.

 

Depending upon the shrine, what is taking place at the time of your visit, and your association with
the particular ceremony, taking photos and video from outside is usually permitted, however from
inside the halls, or from where there is a roof over your head, please use discretion. Eating, drinking
and smoking within the shrine precincts is generally reserved to within designated areas only.

 

By asserting calm and respectful behavior shows your sense of veneration and following these rules
of etiquette helps preserve the dignity of the shrine you are visiting, and will no doubt impress the
Japanese.

 

 

参拝が終わり鳥居を出たら、神社の方に向かって一礼。
余談ですが、昔、武将たちが神社を参拝した際には、腰の左につけている刀が神社に向かないように、
時計回りで180度まわり、神社に向かって一礼した後、ふたたび時計回りにまわって帰ったのだそう。

 

いかがでしたか?
「いちいち細かくて、大変」と思うかもしれませんが参拝のマナーには、それぞれ理由があり、
このマナーや礼儀ただしさこそ「日本の心」です。せっかく神社にお参りするのであれば、
形式的にマナーをマスターするだけではなく、感謝の気持ちを込めて参拝することが大切ですね。

 

 


Related Article of this Post

Blogger

Chris Glenn
Chris Glenn
Sam Ryan
Sam Ryan
中島 大蔵
中島 大蔵
Les Paterson
Les Paterson
山口 晃司
山口 晃司
湯浅 大司
湯浅 大司
Adam Blackrock
Adam Blackrock
名古屋和髪隊
名古屋和髪隊
中島 繁正
中島 繁正
キモノでジャック愛知
キモノでジャック愛知
Pauline Chakmakjian
Pauline Chakmakjian
総合管理者
総合管理者
view more

Interview

Japanese Wooden Barrel Cooper Craftsman, Kurita Minoru Kurita Minoru was born in Nagoya on July 4, 1…More

Nagoya Butsudan (Home Buddhist Altar) Craftsman, Goto Katsumi   Goto Katsumi is the third gener…More

Nagoya Yuzen,  Traditional ArtisanMitsuhisa Horibe    Mr.Mitsuhisa Horibe was born in Nagoya in…More

Discovery

Samurai Signatures, Kao (花押) Samurai Signatures, Kao (花押)  Kao (花押) were stylised identification sig…More

Ninja didn’t wear black! Ninja didn’t wear black! Despite the popular image of the black clothed and…More

Samurai File; Shimazu Tadahisa Samurai File; Shimazu Tadahisa (??-August 1, 1227)  Shimazu Tadahisa,…More

Entertainment

Book; Shogun /  James Clavell  In Osaka castle in the autumn of 1598, the great Japanese leader Toyo…More

The 47 Ronin Story / John Allyn In late 2013, Hollywood released its re-imagined version of the clas…More

BOOK REVIEW; Japonius TyrannusThe Japanese Warlord, Oda Nobunaga reconsidered. This is a brilliant b…More






メルマガの登録・解除

サイトの更新情報やイベント情報をメルマガで配信しています(無料)
メールアドレスを入力し「登録する」ボタンをクリックしてください。登録していただいたメールアドレスにメールが届きます。記載されているURLをクリックしていただくことで登録が完了します。

Japan World mail updates !
Get Japan’s history, culture, events with this free service. Register your e-mail below, then press 「登録する」(left) to register, or「登録解除」to cancel.

 

株式会社電脳職人村

EDITOR BLOG