BLOG

Burial Mound Mania

Adam Blackrock
Adam Blackrock

Adam Blackrock first came to Japan in 1996 for the comics and giant robots, but stayed for the kofun (ancient burial mounds). The longer he stays, the more he realises how much he has yet to learn about the country, its culture, and its history. On his days off, he can often be found exploring a kofun or other archaeological site.

WEBサイト:

Hashihaka Kofun 箸墓古墳: Part 1

2012.08.24 | カテゴリー : 未分類 | 投稿者名 :

Location: Nara-ken, Sakurai-shi, Hashinaka; approximately 15 minutes’ walk south from Makimuku Station
on the JR Sakurai Line


Located at the foot of the sacred Miwayama (Mount Miwa), the Makimuku area in the city of Sakurai, Nara Prefecture, is thought to have been the place from which the Yamato state originated. The district is home to a number of archaeological sites, including several ancient tombs, or kofun.


Resembling a couple of wooded hills from the ground, the Hashihaka Kofun is actually one of the oldest examples of zenpo-koen-fun, or keyhole-shaped tumulus. The keyhole shape can best be appreciated from the air; but for those without ready access to a light aircraft, it’s clearly visible via satellite imagery available online.

 





The tumulus is thought to date from the mid to late 3rd century, which places it in the early Kofun period (late 3rd ~ late 4th century). The total length of the tumulus is 282 metres, making it the 11th largest burial mound in Japan, and the 3rd largest in Nara Prefecture. The round section measures 157 metres in diameter and is 22 metres high, while the square section (the bottom of the ‘keyhole’) is 125 metres wide and 13 metres high.


The construction of the Hashihaka Kofun is thought to represent a turning point in Japanese history, as it is thought to have served as the model for the numerous large keyhole-shaped tombs constructed later throughout Japan. The subsequent spread of this kind of tomb to other regions is thought to indicate a strengthening of alliances between the leaders of different regions and those of the Yamato, making Hashihaka one of the most important kofun for scholars of ancient Japan.




コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*

次のHTML タグと属性が使えます: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Blogger

Chris Glenn
Chris Glenn
Sam Ryan
Sam Ryan
中島 大蔵
中島 大蔵
山内 美鳳
山内 美鳳
Les Paterson
Les Paterson
山口 晃司
山口 晃司
湯浅 大司
湯浅 大司
Adam Blackrock
Adam Blackrock
名古屋和髪隊
名古屋和髪隊
中島 繁正
中島 繁正
キモノでジャック愛知
キモノでジャック愛知
Pauline Chakmakjian
Pauline Chakmakjian
総合管理者
総合管理者
view more

Interview

Japanese Wooden Barrel Cooper Craftsman, Kurita Minoru Kurita Minoru was born in Nagoya on July 4, 1…More

Nagoya Butsudan (Home Buddhist Altar) Craftsman, Goto Katsumi   Goto Katsumi is the third gener…More

Nagoya Yuzen,  Traditional ArtisanMitsuhisa Horibe    Mr.Mitsuhisa Horibe was born in Nagoya in…More

Discovery

Samurai Signatures, Kao (花押) Samurai Signatures, Kao (花押)  Kao (花押) were stylised identification sig…More

Ninja didn’t wear black! Ninja didn’t wear black! Despite the popular image of the black clothed and…More

Samurai File; Shimazu Tadahisa Samurai File; Shimazu Tadahisa (??-August 1, 1227)  Shimazu Tadahisa,…More

Entertainment

Book; Shogun /  James Clavell  In Osaka castle in the autumn of 1598, the great Japanese leader Toyo…More

The 47 Ronin Story / John Allyn In late 2013, Hollywood released its re-imagined version of the clas…More

BOOK REVIEW; Japonius TyrannusThe Japanese Warlord, Oda Nobunaga reconsidered. This is a brilliant b…More






株式会社電脳職人村

EDITOR BLOG